An Extra Track (and a Tacky Badge) set

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VinnieG

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Post 13-Apr-2015 22:22

[Quote]

Bit late with this but I thought Apple's m4a codec was lossless.
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SweetFA

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Post 14-Apr-2015 11:05 (after 12 hours)

[Quote]

Bit late with this but I thought Apple's m4a codec was lossless.
m4a is a container rather than a codec.
If the contents are aac then it's lossy, if the contents are alac ("Apple Lossless") then it's lossless.
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VinnieG

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Post 14-Apr-2015 11:10 (after 5 minutes)

[Quote]

Ah!! Thanks for that!!
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VinnieG

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Post 14-Apr-2015 11:15 (after 4 minutes)

[Quote]

Bit late with this but I thought Apple's m4a codec was lossless.
m4a is a container rather than a codec.
If the contents are aac then it's lossy, if the contents are alac ("Apple Lossless") then it's lossless.
Forgive the possibly stupid question, but how would you go about checking if it was AAC or ALAC within the container? I have a a few m4a that I had assumed were lossless but now feel a bit unsure about them.
Appreciate you pointing me in the right direction. I'm very grateful.
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SweetFA

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Post 14-Apr-2015 11:35 (after 19 minutes)

[Quote]

Forgive the possibly stupid question, but how would you go about checking if it was AAC or ALAC within the container? I have a a few m4a that I had assumed were lossless but now feel a bit unsure about them.
Appreciate you pointing me in the right direction. I'm very grateful.
http://www.applelossless.com/
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VinnieG

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Post 14-Apr-2015 12:40 (after 1 hour 5 minutes)

[Quote]

Forgive the possibly stupid question, but how would you go about checking if it was AAC or ALAC within the container? I have a a few m4a that I had assumed were lossless but now feel a bit unsure about them.
Appreciate you pointing me in the right direction. I'm very grateful.
http://www.applelossless.com/
Sorry. I would have completely understood if you'd written LMGTFY! :oops: I thought it might be more complex than that. Thanks again for your help - and your patience!
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SweetFA

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Post 15-Apr-2015 10:03 (after 21 hour)

[Quote]

Sorry. I would have completely understood if you'd written LMGTFY! :oops: I thought it might be more complex than that. Thanks again for your help - and your patience!
We're nice on here :)
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fabdeswouabs

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Post 13-May-2015 15:12 (after 28 days)

[Quote]

Thanks ;);)
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SecreteDada

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Post 24-Mar-2018 07:39 (after 2 years 10 months)

[Quote]

Thanks
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fak3r

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Post 28-Dec-2018 03:08 (after 9 months 3 days)

[Quote]

Hey, I got an email about this and thought I'd check in, I moved things about and that's why my zip was missing, it's back up now:
http://philcryer.com/download/04RTT146wddim.zip
About the Maga file, was that the flac of the files? Or just the m4a? It was here https://mega.nz/#!TRQzlAxZ!ff_qH0QRnTtQrAA962nUPVQ8fHgmHiEQRBDa7NwGQes - but it has expired.
With the torrent in the start of this posts, and my zip, I believe I have the entire version in m4a now. I've cleaned up some of the formatting, naming structure and included an info.txt file with each release containing the original post text (see next post for that full output). Would it be helpful to build a new torrent of this, or otherwise share here? Just let me know, here's what I have now:
Directories:
01RT131-HandInGlove
02RTT136-ReelAroundTheFountain
03RTT136-ThisCharmingMan
04RTT146-WhatDifferenceDoesItMake
05RTT130-HandInGloveSandieShaw
06RTT156-HeavenKnowsImMiserableNow
07RTT166-WilliamItWasReallyNothing
08RTT171-BarbarismBeginsAtHome
09RTT176-HowSoonIsNow
10RTT181-ShakespearesSister
11RTT186-ThatJokeIsntFunnyAnymore
12RTT191-TheBoyWithTheThornInHisSide
13RTT192-BigmouthStrikesAgain
14RTT193-Panic
15RTT194-Ask
16RTT195-ShopliftersOfTheWorld
17Virgin90299-ThereIsALightThatNeverGoesOut
18RTT196-SheilaTakeABow
19RTT197-GirlfriendInAComa
20RTT198-IStartedSomethingICouldntFinish
21RTT200-LastNightIDreamtThatSomebodyLovedMe
File tree:
.
├── 01RT131-HandInGlove
│   ├── 01 Hand In Glove.m4a
│   ├── 02 Handsome Devil Live.m4a
│   ├── 03 Hand In Glove Live.m4a
│   ├── 04 Front.jpg
│   ├── 05 Back.jpg
│   ├── 06 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 07 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 08 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 04 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 02RTT136-ReelAroundTheFountain
│   ├── 00 Reel Around The Fountain (Troy Tate final mix, Warners source).m4a
│   ├── 01 Reel Around The Fountain Tate.m4a
│   ├── 02 Jeane.m4a
│   ├── 03 Accept Yourself Tate.m4a
│   ├── 04 Wonderful Woman Tate.m4a
│   ├── 05 Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 Print Ad.jpg
│   ├── 08 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 09 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 10 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 03RTT136-ThisCharmingMan
│   ├── 01 TCM Manchester.m4a
│   ├── 02 Jeane.m4a
│   ├── 03 Accept Yourself.m4a
│   ├── 04 Wonderful Woman.m4a
│   ├── 05 TCM London.m4a
│   ├── 06 TCM NY Vocal.m4a
│   ├── 07 TCM NY Instr.m4a
│   ├── 08 TCM Single.m4a
│   ├── 09 TCM Front.jpg
│   ├── 10 TCM Back.jpg
│   ├── 11 TCM Full.jpg
│   ├── 12 TCM Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 13 TCM Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 14 TCM CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 09 TCM Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 04RTT146-WhatDifferenceDoesItMake
│   ├── 01 What Difference Does It Make.m4a
│   ├── 02 Back To The Old House.m4a
│   ├── 03 These Things Take Time.m4a
│   ├── 04 What Difference Does It Make Edit.m4a
│   ├── 05 What Difference Does It Make Tate.m4a
│   ├── 06 Front Terence.jpg
│   ├── 07 Back Terence.jpg
│   ├── 08 Slipcase Terence.jpg
│   ├── 09 Jewel Case Terence.jpg
│   ├── 10 Front Moz.jpg
│   ├── 11 Back Moz.jpg
│   ├── 12 Slipcase Moz.jpg
│   ├── 13 Jewel Case Moz.jpg
│   ├── 14 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 15 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 06 Front Terence.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 05RTT130-HandInGloveSandieShaw
│   ├── 01 Hand In Glove.m4a
│   ├── 02 I Don't Owe You Anything.m4a
│   ├── 03 Jeane.m4a
│   ├── 04 Hand In Glove Alternate.m4a
│   ├── 05 Sandie Shaw Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Sandie Shaw Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 08 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 09 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 10 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 Sandie Shaw Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 06RTT156-HeavenKnowsImMiserableNow
│   ├── 01 Heaven Knows Im Miserable Now.m4a
│   ├── 02 Girl Afraid.m4a
│   ├── 03 Suffer Little Children.m4a
│   ├── 04 Girl Afraid Live.m4a
│   ├── 05 This Night Has Opened My Eyes.m4a
│   ├── 06 Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now (12 inch).m4a
│   ├── 07 Back.jpg
│   ├── 08 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 09 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 10 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 11 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 06 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 07RTT166-WilliamItWasReallyNothing
│   ├── 01 William It Was Really Nothing.m4a
│   ├── 02 How Soon Is Now.m4a
│   ├── 03 Please Please Please Let Me Get What I Want.m4a
│   ├── 04 How Soon Is Now Withdrawn Version.m4a
│   ├── 05 Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 Full.jpg
│   ├── 08 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 09 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 10 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 11 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 08RTT171-BarbarismBeginsAtHome
│   ├── 01 Barbarism Begins At Home.m4a
│   ├── 02 Shakespeares Sister.m4a
│   ├── 03 Stretch Out And Wait US Version.m4a
│   ├── 04 Barbarism Begins At Home Edit.m4a
│   ├── 05 BBAH Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 BBAH Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 BBAH Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 08 BBAH Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 09 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 BBAH Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 09RTT176-HowSoonIsNow
│   ├── 01 How Soon Is Now.m4a
│   ├── 02 Well I Wonder.m4a
│   ├── 03 Oscillate Wildly.m4a
│   ├── 04 How Soon Is Now Edit.m4a
│   ├── 05 The Headmaster Ritual Edit.m4a
│   ├── 06 HSIN Front.jpg
│   ├── 07 HSIN Back.jpg
│   ├── 08 HSIN Poster.jpg
│   ├── 09 HSIN Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 10 HSIN Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 11 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 06 HSIN Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 10RTT181-ShakespearesSister
│   ├── 01 Shakespeares Sister.m4a
│   ├── 02 What She Said.m4a
│   ├── 03 Stretch Out And Wait UK.m4a
│   ├── 04 Front.jpg
│   ├── 05 Back.jpg
│   ├── 06 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 07 Slipcase Template.jpg
│   ├── 08 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 09 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 04 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 11RTT186-ThatJokeIsntFunnyAnymore
│   ├── 01 That Joke Isnt Funny Anymore.m4a
│   ├── 02 William It Was Really Nothing Live.m4a
│   ├── 03 Nowhere Fast Live.m4a
│   ├── 04 Stretch Out And Wait Live.m4a
│   ├── 05 Shakespeares Sister Live.m4a
│   ├── 06 Meat Is Murder Live.m4a
│   ├── 07 Miserable Lie Live.m4a
│   ├── 08 That Joke Isnt Funny Anymore 7 Edit.m4a
│   ├── 09 The Headmaster Ritual.m4a
│   ├── 10 Front.jpg
│   ├── 11 Back.jpg
│   ├── 12 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 13 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 14 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 15 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── 16 Headmaster Front.jpg
│   ├── 17 Headmaster Back.jpg
│   ├── 18 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 19 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 20 Headmaster CD Front.jpg
│   ├── 21 Headmaster CD Back.jpg
│   ├── 22 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 23 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 10 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 12RTT191-TheBoyWithTheThornInHisSide
│   ├── 01 The Boy With The Thorn In His Side Single Version.m4a
│   ├── 02 Rubber Ring.m4a
│   ├── 03 Asleep.m4a
│   ├── 04 Front.jpg
│   ├── 05 Back.jpg
│   ├── 06 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 07 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 08 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 09 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 04 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 13RTT192-BigmouthStrikesAgain
│   ├── 01 Bigmouth Strikes Again.m4a
│   ├── 02 Money Changes Everything.m4a
│   ├── 03 Unloveable.m4a
│   ├── 04 Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others Australian Edit.m4a
│   ├── 05 Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 08 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 09 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 10 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 14RTT193-Panic
│   ├── 01 Panic.m4a
│   ├── 02 Vicar In A Tutu.m4a
│   ├── 03 The Draize Train.m4a
│   ├── 04 Front.jpg
│   ├── 05 Back.jpg
│   ├── 06 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 07 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 08 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 09 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 04 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 15RTT194-Ask
│   ├── 01 Ask (Single Version) 1.m4a
│   ├── 02 Cemetry Gates 1.m4a
│   ├── 03 Golden Lights 1.m4a
│   ├── 04 Ask (Album Version) 1.m4a
│   ├── 05 Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 08 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 09 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 10 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 16RTT195-ShopliftersOfTheWorld
│   ├── 01 Shoplifters Of The World Unite 1.m4a
│   ├── 02 London 1.m4a
│   ├── 03 Half A Person 1.m4a
│   ├── 04 You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby (UK Verion - Repitched) 1.m4a
│   ├── 05 You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby (US Verion - Repitched) 1.m4a
│   ├── 06 Front.jpg
│   ├── 07 Back.jpg
│   ├── 08 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 09 Plastic Bag.jpg
│   ├── 10 Plastic Bag.jpg
│   ├── 11 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 12 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 13 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 06 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 17Virgin90299-ThereIsALightThatNeverGoesOut
│   ├── 01 There Is A Light That Never Goes Out.m4a
│   ├── 02 London (Dec 1986 Peel Session).m4a
│   ├── 03 Half A Person (Dec 1986 Peel Session).m4a
│   ├── 04 Front.jpg
│   ├── 05 Back.jpg
│   ├── 06 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 07 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 08 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 04 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 18RTT196-SheilaTakeABow
│   ├── 01 Sheila Take A Bow 1.m4a
│   ├── 02 Is It Really So Strange_ 1.m4a
│   ├── 03 Sweet And Tender Hooligan 1.m4a
│   ├── 04 Sheila Take A Bow (John Porter Version) 1.m4a
│   ├── 05 Front.jpg
│   ├── 06 Back.jpg
│   ├── 07 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 08 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 09 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 10 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 05 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 19RTT197-GirlfriendInAComa
│   ├── 01 Girlfriend In A Coma.m4a
│   ├── 02 Work Is A Four-Letter Word.m4a
│   ├── 03 I Keep Mine Hidden.m4a
│   ├── 04 Work Is A Four-Letter Word 7_ Edit.m4a
│   ├── 05 Girlfriend In A Coma Demo.m4a
│   ├── 06 Front.jpg
│   ├── 07 Back.jpg
│   ├── 08 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 09 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 10 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 11 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 06 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
├── 20RTT198-IStartedSomethingICouldntFinish
│   ├── 01 I Started Something I Couldn't Finish.m4a
│   ├── 02 Pretty Girls Make Graves.m4a
│   ├── 03 Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others Live.m4a
│   ├── 04 What's The World Live.m4a
│   ├── 05 Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before.m4a
│   ├── 06 Front.jpg
│   ├── 07 Back.jpg
│   ├── 08 Poster.jpg
│   ├── 09 Slipcase.jpg
│   ├── 10 Jewel Case.jpg
│   ├── 11 CD Label.jpg
│   ├── cover.jpg -> 06 Front.jpg
│   └── info.txt
└── 21RTT200-LastNightIDreamtThatSomebodyLovedMe
    ├── 01 Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me.m4a
    ├── 02 Rusholme Ruffians August 1984 Peel Session.m4a
    ├── 03 Nowhere Fast August 1984 Peel Session.m4a
    ├── 04 William, It Was Really Nothing August 1984 Peel Session.m4a
    ├── 05 How Soon Is Now August 1984 Peel Session.m4a
    ├── 06 Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me Edit.m4a
    ├── 07 Front.jpg
    ├── 08 Back.jpg
    ├── 09 Poster.jpg
    ├── 10 Slipcase.jpg
    ├── 11 Jewel Case.jpg
    ├── 12 CD Label.jpg
    ├── cover.jpg -> 07 Front.jpg
    └── info.txt


Last edited by fak3r on 2018-12-28 19:31; edited 2 times in total
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fak3r

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Longevity: 11 years

Posts: 7

Post 28-Dec-2018 03:52 (after 44 minutes)

[Quote]

I've captured all the text from the original posts, and have added them as info.txt files in my copy - here is the text of all of them, with releases broken by
+++++
Sunday, October 31, 2010
ET(aatb) 01: RT131 Hand In Glove
Zip File (28.9 MB)
"Hand In Glove"
Rough Trade RT131
Produced by The Smiths
May 1983
Tracks:
1 Hand In Glove (original single version)
2 Handsome Devil (live)
3 Hand In Glove (live at Brixton Ace 29 June 1983)
Sources:
1 from Hatful of Hollow Rough Trade CD ROUGHCD76
2 from Handsome Devils WEA France promo CD PRO 2005 _ 2, 1992
3 from "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out" WEA YZ0003CD1, 1992
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
The Smiths' calling card. Thundering out of the gate with one of the band's most "wall-of-sound" tracks, this record sounded nothing of its time in comparison to other 1983 records. Recorded with Joe Moss' money at Stockport's legendary Strawberry Studios (while the band was still seeking a record deal), and with the band handling basic production duties, Rough Trade released this on spec when handed a copy of the finished record. As they only recorded "Hand In Glove" at Strawberry, they dug into their not-very-deep vault for the B-side, a stomping take on "Handsome Devil" recorded live at the Hacienda in February 1983.
Morrissey was still bemoaning this record's relative chart failure a year after release, begging gig-going punters to keep buying it.
The Smiths never sounded this raw again. While I never used to rate "Hand In Glove" (though always loved "Handsome Devil"), I have developed a growing fondness for this take ever since having to (repeatedly) audition it while working on the audio segment of this endeavour. I think this was the perfect first release for this band - immediately sounding the consummate studio band on the A-side, and a storming live entity on the flip.
The bonus track here, "Hand In Glove" recorded live at the Brixton Ace, was initially a radio promo track sent out by Rough Trade on cassette in late summer 1983, and finally saw official release on the long-deleted WEA "There Is A Light..." CD single in 1992. Not necessarily a stellar version or recording, nonetheless it's a key track in the archives and for that reason belongs here.
You will have to forgive me if you are looking for meaningful insight on Morrissey's lyrics, for these or any other tracks we may be featuring. I was always drawn to this band by Johnny Marr's guitars, and Andy Rourke's unparalleled bass work. I always thought the Moz as a bit of a character, never reading anything more into his lyrics than just that, they being lyrics because the band didn't want to only record instrumentals. So in discussing the songs, I'll tend to stick to what I can speak of best, usually the music.
Posted by Analog Loyalist at 9:42 PM 28 comments
+++++
Sunday, October 31, 2010
ET(aatb) 02: RTT136A Reel Around The Fountain (withdrawn Troy Tate single)
Zip File (45 MB)
Zip File #2 (Warners-sourced Tate "Reel Around The Fountain)
"Reel Around The Fountain"
Rough Trade RTT136 (-A for this blog)
Produced by Troy Tate
Summer 1983 (not released)
Tracks:
0 Reel Around The Fountain **new pristine Warners source** --- see below
1 Reel Around The Fountain
2 Jeane
3 Accept Yourself
4 Wonderful Woman
Sources:
0 from the new double LP bootleg featuring unreleased mixes/demos, sourced from Warner Strategic Marketing product
1, 3-4 from a tape containing the alleged "Final Mixes" of the abandoned Troy Tate 1st LP sessions
2 from "This Charming Man" WEA YZ0001CD1, 1992
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Summer 1983 saw the band repair to Elephant Studios, Wapping with Teardrop Explodes guitarist Troy Tate handling production duties of that "critical" first LP. As any fan knows, this session ultimately was abandoned, with the recordings scrapped and restarted with John Porter in Manchester that fall.
While the Tate project was still active, the plan was for the Smiths' 2nd single to be the Tate recording of "Reel Around The Fountain", backed by "Jeane". (Some think they were planning on releasing one of the BBC session versions of "RATF" as the single; however, Simon Goddard, in the wonderful book Songs That Saved Your Life, states otherwise - that it was the Tate recording that was planned for use. I trust Goddard on this one.) This got as far as the test pressing stage, at which point Johnny had come up with "This Charming Man" and Rough Trade decided that "TCM" would be the 2nd single instead.
Print ads were placed promoting the Tate "Reel Around The Fountain" single release, and as far as can be determined, the actual single was to be a 7" only. We are using the Tate recordings of "Accept Yourself" and "Wonderful Woman" as the extra tracks, to give an idea of what a Tate 12" would be like using the same songs ultimately used for the "TCM" 12" (coming up later on the blog).
This is a great fake single. I love the rawness of the Tate recordings; Tate managed to capture Mike Joyce's drums like no other producer did - besides the odd BBC session - in the band's entire recording career. They thunder! They boom! The band, in my humble opinion, committed a great error in binning the Tate recordings. We can only hope that someone, somewhere, decides to un-bin these and officially release them, in pristine condition. Until then....
******** UPDATE ********
Late December 2010 saw a surprise "release" of a double LP vinyl bootleg entirely comprised of unreleased, sometimes unmixed, rough takes, monitor mixes, etc from various Smiths sessions dating from the initial Troy Tate summer 1983 debut LP sessions, to the final album sessions with Stephen Street in spring 1987. Among this material was the final, as far as Warners knew, mix done by Tate of "Reel Around The Fountain". Needless to say a pristine, spectacular stereo transfer of this was sourced and used here.
I probably shouldn't, because it only raises expectations of a full release of the entire Tate session knowing Warners has it in this quality, but here's the mythical Track 0 (zeroth track?) as it really should replace entirely our original Track 1. You've never heard Tate's "Reel Around The Fountain" in this quality, and if I hadn't mentioned its lineage from vinyl, one would think I nicked the Warners half-inch master and went from there.
Mr and Ms Warners, may we have the rest of this session too, please? It would make an excellent Christmas 2011 gift, just like the one a couple weeks ago!
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 10:05 PM 16 comments
+++++
Monday, December 27, 2010
ET(aatb) 03: RTT136 "This Charming Man"
Zip File (68.4 MB)
"This Charming Man"
Rough Trade RTT136
Produced by John Porter
(except 2 produced by Troy Tate)
(tracks 6-7 remix Francois Kevorkian @ Right Track Studios, New York)
October/December 1983
Tracks:
1 This Charming Man (Manchester)
2 Jeane
3 Accept Yourself
4 Wonderful Woman
5 This Charming Man (London)
6 This Charming Man (New York Vocal)
7 This Charming Man (New York Instrumental)
8 This Charming Man (Single Remix)
Sources:
1-4 from "This Charming Man" WEA YZ0001CD1, 1992
5-8 from "This Charming Man" WEA YZ0001CD2, 1992
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazingVulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
As production was running up on the soon-to-be-abandoned "Reel Around The Fountain" single, the band was still busily writing new material. In a 24-hour timespan Marr came up with two classic tracks, shortly before a September 1983 Peel Session: "Still Ill" and "This Charming Man". Chuffed with the quality of these two new tracks, the band recorded them for the first time for Peel, and upon hearing "TCM", Rough Trade supremo Geoff Travis immediately new what the next single should be.
This was John Porter's first production with the band. It was also the first recording with Marr laying a million guitar tracks down on the recording; one can argue that had Porter not worked on this record, the Smiths - and specifically Johnny Marr - would not have ultimately received all the acclaim now given.
There are "Manchester" and "London" versions (we'll discuss "New York" in a moment) because immediately after the Peel recording session, the band and Porter attempted to record the single in a London studio. Not happy with the results, and with Geoff Travis wanting a more Northern sound, the band regrouped in Manchester a week later and re-recorded the whole thing. So the "Manchester" version became the well-known single, and the "London" version appeared on the 12" as a B-side. "Accept Yourself" and "Wonderful Woman" both came from the London sessions, while "Jeane" was a remnant from the Troy Tate sessions (apparently always being tagged as a B-side track).
New York producer Francois Kevorkian was then handed the multitracks to follow U2's lead in making "New York" versions for club airings; hence the two "New York" variants. While one may laugh at the ultimate dancefloor usefulness of these tracks, allegedly Morrissey and Marr despised them and blamed Travis for releasing this against their wishes. I don't buy it for a second, but that's revisionism for you. More reconstructions than remixes, I don't mind either NY variant, but as far as the canon goes, they're eminently disposable.
Tracks 3, 5, 7 and 8 are no longer officially available, as they last saw release on the now out-of-print 1992 WEA singles.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 12:08 AM 30 comments
Artwork
I've fixed the typo on the sleeve for Hand In Glove. For future reference, all the artwork files are uploaded to my Flickr stream, so you can grab them there. Click on the image you want to replace, and go to actions > view all sizes > original, then click download.
Handy hint: you can often get a sneak peek at what's coming if you check Flickr. The artwork goes up there before the files go online.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 12:03 AM 2 comments
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Wednesday, January 26, 2011
ET(aatb) 04: RTT146 "What Difference Does It Make?"
Zip File (43 MB)
"What Difference Does It Make?"
Rough Trade RTT146
Produced by John Porter
January 1984
Tracks:
1 What Difference Does It Make?
2 Back To The Old House
3 These Things Take Time
4 What Difference Does It Make? (7 inch edit)
5 What Difference Does It Make? (Troy Tate abandoned version)
Sources:
1-3 from "What Difference Does It Make?" RTT146CD, 1988
4 edited from same
5 from a tape containing the alleged "Final Mixes" of the abandoned Troy Tate 1st LP sessions
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction as required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting
Artwork for this, and nearly every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
This, the band's third single, delved a bit deeper into their songwriting history for the title track. While the prior "This Charming Man" was a relatively brand-new song at the time it was released as a single, "What Difference Does It Make?" was amongst the first batch of songs Morrissey and Marr composed together, back in late 1982.
Featuring an immediate, grabbing guitar motif, this track was recorded initially for John Peel (and obtainable on Hatful Of Hollow), and then subsequently re-recorded both by Troy Tate (for the abandoned first LP sessions), and finally John Porter (what we have here as the A-side, and, later, as featured on their debut LP). The Peel version is more of a stomper, with a loose, heavy groove laid down by Mike Joyce. Most "experts" on the Smiths prefer the Peel version, and I count myself firmly
in that camp. It just has more "oomph", more power, it's just a better take on the song. The Porter/A-side version, featured here, is just "eh". I don't think the groove was quite captured in this take, and the guitars sound strangely neutered.
But, it is what it is.
The B-side tracks are infintely more interesting. "Back To The Old House" is a re-worked, re-arranged variant on the acoustic Hatful Of Hollow/BBC session version, and "These Things Take Time" most definitely should have wormed its way into the debut LP tracklisting. I know that I'm the most inept that ever slept, indeed.
We've chosen to bonus this single with a Tate recording of the title track. It's not as crystalline as the Tate "Reel Around The Fountain" single fantasy, but it's an interesting, and welcomed, re-interpretation of the song. It's notably in a different key than the Porter version, and Marr chirps right along on a harmonica in rhythm with his own guitar track.
It's hard to spice up conversation about this single. I've never really rated it as a stunner in the band's catalog, but there you are. Far more interesting are the various cover combinations, with the Terrence Stamp sleeve, then the Morrissey faux-Stamp sleeve, then Stamp with the band's name, Morrissey with the band's name, etc and etc and etc. I'll let our co-host, if he so chooses, carry on with that part of the discussion...
Update from 50 Pound Note - ugh, I simply cannot seem to get through the artwork for one of these singles without a typo slipping through. It's annoying. The RTT number on the CD face was incorrect, so you may grab the fixed one here.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 12:55 AM 11 comments
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Wednesday, January 26, 2011
ET(aatb) 05: RTT130 "Hand In Glove" - The Sandie Shaw Single
Zip File (35 MB)
"Hand In Glove" - The Sandie Shaw Single
Rough Trade RTT130
Produced by John Porter
February/March 1984
Tracks:
1 Hand In Glove
2 I Don't Owe You Anything
3 Jeane
4 Hand In Glove (rare alternate mix)
Sources:
1-3 from "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out" (WEA YZ0003CD2, October 1992)
4 from The Smiths (Tokuma Japan 35JC-102, September 1984)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Allow me to preface this with two basic incontrovertible facts: 1) I am not English, and 2) I am not a fan of 1960s English bubblegum pop.
To me - a Yank in the frozen tundra of the Great Lakes - this single is frankly an oddity in an otherwise nearly blemish-free catalog. I have no idea of the cultural import this single had at the time; were Brits driven to the record stores in teeming mad droves at the news a faded Sixties pop diva was replacing Morrissey on a 12"? I'm trying to think of an American analogue to this: Perhaps if Cher had quit, or dropped out of the limelight, after "I Got You Babe" and then 30 years later fronted Green Day for a single. Regardless, to me, this record has always had a big question mark superimposed on top of it. I frankly didn't get it when I first heard it, and I still don't get it now.
That said... Marr goes poppy on these new arrangements, and I have to say his simple, breezy take on "Jeane" perhaps is the quintessential backing for this song. When I reach for the acoustic to strum Marr, I often return to this arrangement. I don't think the "Hand In Glove" musical re-statement is better or worse than the classic; it's different, and Marr had to do something to match the tune (and also that for "I Don't Owe You Anything") to Shaw's vocals.
Track 4 came from an unnamed co-conspirator, ripped from a copy of the relatively (very) rare original September 1984 Japanese CD pressing of the debut LP; it along with three other tracks were unique bonus tracks on this CD. I do not believe this mix is available anywhere else; if anything, it's even more Marr-riffic than the common mix.
English readers, please enlighten me as to why I should give a Shaw for the existence of this record.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 11:50 PM 24 comments
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Sunday, March 6, 2011
ET(aatb) 06: RTT156 "Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now"
Zip File (49.4 MB)
Track 6 M4A (10MB)
"Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now"
Rough Trade RTT156
Produced by John Porter
March 1984
Tracks:
1 Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now
2 Girl Afraid
3 Suffer Little Children
4 Girl Afraid (live in Glasgow 2 March 1984)
5 This Night Has Opened My Eyes
** new **
6 Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now (12" extended mix)
Sources:
1-3 from "Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now" (RTT 156CD, November 1988)
4 from NME Department of Enjoyment cassette (NME011, 1985, via the bootleg CD Asleep)
5 from Hatful of Hollow (ROUGHCD76, December 1985)
6 re-edited from 1 based on link shared by a reader
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
The first Smiths single that earned them their "depressive" tag. Nothing spectacular about this; Marr's summery retro composition of the title track belies the subtle moping humor of Moz's lyric (which was written during a miserable first visit as a band to America for a New Years Eve gig in December 1983). "Girl Afraid" is a better track; in my humble opinion it's lasted better than the A-side. "Suffer Little Children" is simply a reprise of the same track on the debut LP, no more, no less. Due to the exposure this track received because of the relative high chart placing of this single, however, controversy arose due to its subject matter (the Moors Murders) despite the track having been available for some time as the final track on the debut LP.
Track 4 was taken from the bootleg CD Asleep, part of the Chelsea label's vaunted collection of otherwise-unavailable-and-rare outtakes, BBC sessions, and rare compilation tracks. It's raw and rough, but a nice version of the song.
Track 5 was/is the only officially available version of this track, recorded as part of a Peel Session for the BBC in September 1983, and was first made available on record as part of November 1984's Hatful of Hollow compilation LP. The studio version (from June 1984) was yet to be recorded at the time of the "Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now" single release, and did not surface until December 2010 as part of the legendary Demos and Outtakes double LP bootleg.
*** addendum ***
Thanks to a kind reader who supplied a link to an actual rip (mp3 only) of an actual original-pressing 12" with the rare extended version of "Heaven Knows...", I've uploaded Track 6, a recreation of the same. Really it's only the "In my life..." segment repeated, but it's good to have nonetheless. Link here!
http://smithsrecycle.blogspot.com/
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 1:03 AM 31 comments
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Thursday, March 10, 2011
ET(aatb) 07: RTT166 "William, It Was Really Nothing"
Zip File (52 MB)
"William, It Was Really Nothing"
Rough Trade RTT166
Produced by John Porter
July 1984
Tracks:
1 William, It Was Really Nothing
2 How Soon Is Now?
3 Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want
4 How Soon Is Now? (withdrawn alternate mix)
Sources:
1-3 from "William, It Was Really Nothing" (RTT 166CD, fall 1988)
4 from "William, It Was Really Nothing" (Italy, Virgin VINX71 12" single, 1984)
(thanks to Steve)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
If this record was all the Smiths ever released as a band, they'd be legendary. This 3-track 12" collects three, easily, of the best songs ever written and performed by the band.
"William, It Was Really Nothing" is all a modern pop single isn't. There's no chorus, really - or should it be said the chorus lasts for 2/3 of the song? It's a hair over 2 minutes long, it's quick and to-the-point. The entire song nearly sums up Johnny Marr's passion for guitars. A real gem.
"How Soon Is Now?" - well, there's nothing I can add about this song that isn't already legendary. It's a shame this was initially wasted on a B-side, though the label did come to its senses (far too late, it must be said) eventually and properly released this some months later as an A-side in its own right.
"Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want" - the final track on the original single - is, along with "How Soon Is Now?", a contender for many fans' favorite Smiths track of all time. The late American "Brat Pack" movie director John Hughes loved it so much, he used it twice in his 1980s films - both as the Smiths original, and as a cover by the Dream Academy. Many had their first exposure to this track via the Pretty In Pink soundtrack LP (including yours truly), and it only grew from there.
The Italians, when given the masters for their own local release of this 12" single, somehow got their reels confused and initially released a highly unique rough mix of "How Soon Is Now?" instead of the final, approved take. While it doesn't start off terribly different (the guitars are mixed differently, but that's about it in the first quarter of the song), it quickly devolves into a most unique version. Moz gets to exercise his moaning organ a bit, and there's a great bit where the band comes to a complete stop with Moz clearly saying "OK?" to producer John Porter, and then a few seconds later the track fades back up to the final closing. There are other vastly different instrumental sections in the latter third of the song that make this a great listen as well. When made aware of their error, the Italians quickly corrected it before too many records hit the shops, and replaced it with the final, approved take.
http://smithsrecycle.blogspot.com/
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 8:38 AM 18 comments
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Wednesday, June 29, 2011
ET(aatb) 08: RTT171 "Barbarism Begins At Home"
Zip File (43.7 MB)
"Barbarism Begins At Home"
Rough Trade RTT171
Produced by The Smiths
January 1985 (UK promo 12" and foreign territory commercial release only)
November 1988 (UK commercial CD single)
Tracks:
1 Barbarism Begins At Home
2 Shakespeare's Sister
3 Stretch Out And Wait ("US version")
4 Barbarism Begins At Home (edit)
Sources:
1 from Meat Is Murder (ROUGHCD81, April 1985)
2-4 from "Barbarism Begins At Home" (RTT 171CD, November 1988)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazingVulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Here is where we have to begin taking some liberties with the discography. While this actual "RTT 171CD" itself wasn't issued as a commercial product until November 1988, "Barbarism" was released as a promo (and a commercial single in some territories outside the UK) in early 1985 to promote the then-upcoming Meat Is Murder LP. What is hard to determine, due to Rough Trade's casual bookkeeping, is the actual release order (and that the territories often released material on their own schedules). I cannot for the life of me determine which was made generally available first: this promo/commercial 12", or RTT 176 "How Soon Is Now?". So I made the executive decision to go numerically in the catalog, by RTT catalog number instead.
Some nominate "Barbarism" for the best Andy Rourke bassline in existence; while I would agree that it's fantastic, I think Rourke's talents are displayed in better fashion on other tracks. What is more interesting about this record is that - considering we are dealing with Morrissey - it is so utterly un-Smithlike in its very being. The full-length track is an extended funk workout showing off the power of the band in a fashion not seen again until 1986, while the edit is a quick and dirty summation of the track.
"Shakespeare's Sister" - which we'll see again in a couple singles - is perhaps the quirkiest recording in the catalog. I think it suffers from "throw it all in the mix" syndrome; there are no "hooks", no catchy motifs, that draw the listener in. It's too condensed and blurred to really sustain impact, and the record-buying public agreed in that it was basically a non-starter in the charts. I might go on to say it's a forgettable song; I never find myself having the urge to throw it on and listen unlike the majority of other tracks in their stellar catalog.
"Stretch Out And Wait" is called the "US version" here for no other reason than to separate it from the actual B-side version used for the then-upcoming "Shakespeare's Sister" single release. It's a different mix and vocal recording that first appeared in 1987 on both The World Won't Listen and Louder Than Bombs, and was also used for the late 1988 RTT 171CD release.
http://smithsrecycle.blogspot.com/
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:50 PM 14 comments
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Wednesday, June 29, 2011
ET(aatb) 09: RTT176 "How Soon Is Now?"
Zip File (49.4 MB)
"How Soon Is Now?"
Rough Trade RTT176
Produced by John Porter and The Smiths
Early 1985
Tracks:
1 How Soon Is Now?
2 Well I Wonder
3 Oscillate Wildly
4 How Soon Is Now? (USA 7" Phil Brown edit)
5 The Headmaster Ritual (USA 7" Phil Brown edit)
Sources:
1 from "William, It Was Really Nothing" (RTT 166CD, Fall 1988)
2 from Meat Is Murder (ROUGHCD81, April 1985)
3 from The World Won't Listen (ROUGHCD101, February 1987)
4, 5 from "How Soon Is Now?" (USA Sire 9 29007-7, summer 1985)
(4, 5 re-edited by Analog Loyalist from original full-length versions)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazingVulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
"How Soon Is Now?" needs no introduction. A track released as a B-side, then on the compilation Hatful Of Hollow, and then a few months later as an A-side in its own right. Par for the course, Rough Trade.
"Well I Wonder" is easily amongst my (and fans all over) top Smiths songs of all time. Oddly it was also the only main track of theirs never to be performed live, barring the obviousStrangeways album and the odd B-side. Gentle acoustic, forlorn lyrics, the gentle washing of the rain. Brilliant work and well deserved of its early release here (some two weeks prior to the actual Meat Is Murder LP release, if Simon Goddard has it right).
"Oscillate Wildly" was the first (of an eventual three) instrumental track released by the band. Credited to Morrissey/Marr, Morrissey obviously didn't contribute to the record but was in full favor of it. Amongst my friends in the late 1980s, this was THE track to play on piano once you learned your way around the keys a bit.
The two 7" edits closing out this post, Phil Brown edits of "How Soon Is Now?" and "The Headmaster Ritual", are unique to an American 7" on Sire that never saw wide release. While we were given fairly clean transfers of this 7" to work from, I chose to re-engineer the edits from the original full-length tracks so as to better maintain sonic consistency throughout the release. The "HSIN?" edit is wonky and at times jarring, but it's exactly as it was in the original Phil Brown edit, and is unique for that alone. "Headmaster" is done brilliantly: precise, surgical trimming of the track down to its essence and would have made a fantastic "radio edit" had the label(s) chosen that route. I find myself listening to this edit more than the full-length version!
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 10:06 PM 32 comments
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Thursday, September 29, 2011
ET(aatb) 10: RTT181 "Shakespeare's Sister"
Zip File (31.3 MB)
"Shakespeare's Sister"
Rough Trade RTT181
Produced by The Smiths
March 1985
Tracks:
1 Shakespeare's Sister
2 What She Said
3 Stretch Out And Wait ("UK version")
Sources:
1, 3 from The World Won't Listen (ROUGHCD101, February 1987)
2 from Meat Is Murder (ROUGHCD81, April 1985)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazingVulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Interestingly enough, rather than pull a track from the then-new LP, the band chose a new track instead as the single release.
"Shakespeare's Sister" I've written about previously. My thoughts remain - in my opinion the weakest track in an otherwise stellar singles discography, and the relatively poor chart performance reflected the common opinion being of a similar note.
"What She Said" - pulled from the then-current LP Meat Is Murder - is a strong, powerful, near-metallic Marr tour de force. Always a live favorite, one can make the argument that this track itself would have made a better single than the actual single track itself, with "Shakespeare's Sister" being the B-side.
"Stretch Out And Wait" - appended with the "UK version" suffix here to differentiate it from the alternate version first released on Louder than Bombs and subsequently the RTT171 CD single of "Barbarism Begins At Home" - is the original version of this track. A classic track that, again, shows the band's penchant for burying their very best tracks on the back side of the 12", where your average punter may fear to tread. Maybe this was intentional? A form of secret Smiths society whereby only the initiated know the pure depth and quality of their deep catalog? Only the band knows.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 12:19 AM 25 comments
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Tuesday, November 8, 2011
ET(aatb) 11: RTT186 "That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore" AKA "Meat Is Murder Live EP"
Zip File (137 MB)
"That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore"
Rough Trade RTT186
Produced by The Smiths
(live tracks mixed by Stephen Street)
July 1985
alternate:
"The Headmaster Ritual"
Megadisc MD 125295
Produced by The Smiths
(live tracks mixed by Stephen Street)
early summer 1985
alternate:
"The Headmaster Ritual"
Rough Trade RTT215CD
Produced by The Smiths
(live tracks mixed by Stephen Street)
November 1988
Tracks:
1 That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore
2 William, It Was Really Nothing (live)
3 Nowhere Fast (live)
4 Stretch Out And Wait (live)
5 Shakespeare's Sister (live)
6 Meat Is Murder (live)
7 Miserable Lie (live)
8 That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore (7" edit)
9 The Headmaster Ritual
Sources:
1, 9 from Meat Is Murder (UK: ROUGHCD81, April 1985)
2 from Westwood One In Concert New Rock (USA: Westwood One #95-40, September 1995)
3-4, 6 from "The Headmaster Ritual" (UK: Rough Trade RTT215CD, November 1988)
5 from "That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore" (UK: Rough Trade RTT186 12" single, July 1985)
7 from Rough Trade Compilation (Canada: Rough Trade RTS1986 vinyl LP)
8 edited from 1
Intros and crossfades created from the 2009 Rhino CD Singles Box variant of "That Joke..."
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Crossfades and patching galore (see below).
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Summer 1985 saw Rough Trade (or the band) proposing a live EP based on the Meat Is MurderUK Spring 1985 tour: the 18 March 1985 Oxford gig was recorded by the BBC and tapes given to Rough Trade to use. Using the RTT186 catalog number, very limited test pressings of the 7" and 12" "Meat Is Murder - Live EP" records were cut. The tracklistings for the proposed releases were as follows:
7" (RT186): Meat Is Murder - Live EP
Meat Is Murder
Nowhere Fast
Stretch Out And Wait
12" (RTT186): Meat Is Murder - Live EP
Meat Is Murder
Nowhere Fast
Stretch Out And Wait
William, It Was Really Nothing
Miserable Lie
For unknown reasons this release was scrapped, with the decision made to pull "That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore" off the LP as a single, with the live tracks from the Oxford gig used as the B-sides, and the whole package remaining under the root RT(T)186 catalog number. Left behind from the final official product were "William..." and "Miserable Lie", though "Shakespeare's Sister" was added to the package as a consolation gift of sorts. The final tally:
7" (RT186)
That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore (edit)
Meat Is Murder (live)
12" (RTT186)
That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore
Nowhere Fast (live)
Stretch Out And Wait (live)
Shakespeare's Sister (live)
Meat Is Murder (live)
Meanwhile, the Europeans via Megadisc decided to use an alternate sleeve with an alternate A-side, though kept the 12" B-sides, and released "The Headmaster Ritual" at roughly the same time. The alternate sleeve remains a classic sleeve in the canon, hence the reason for including it here.
In 1988 Rough Trade began releasing, in haphazard fashion, the band's 12" back catalog on CD single. The rarest of these - RTT215CD using "The Headmaster Ritual" as the "A-side" with 3 of the 4 live tracks from the RTT186 12" as B-sides ("Nowhere Fast" / "Stretch Out..." / "Meat Is Murder") - was quickly withdrawn as the cover star quickly protested use of the artwork, so only a handful made it out to collectors. Again, its rarity (and classicism as cover art) warrants its inclusion here.
Finally, in 2009 Rhino UK released a box set of the first ten or so singles as individual CD singles, and in the process used a new transfer of the Oxford live set as the basis for their release. How do we know this? The original Rough Trade 7" and 12" from 1985 was one of the most piss-poor edit hack jobs I've ever heard, with drumstick click-ins from the wrong song leading into the various tracks, really poor edit points, etc. While the proper click intros were restored on the Rhino CD, the outtros were faded out rather than edited into the next track. It too was a poor overall experience.
I repaired and enhanced the live selection with the help of an excellent team of co-conspirators, who not only lent their considerable collections to the endeavour, but their equipment as well. Basically, I used the raw audio sources as detailed up top in the tracklist descriptions, with the intros stolen from the Rhino CD, and patched it all together. We finally have a coherent, quality assemblage of the best versions available of the "released" live tracks, nicely crossfaded, source-matched, and pristine.
Yes I am aware of the existence of "What She Said" from this gig on an NME 7", and I have several transfers of this, but the quality (I blame the pressing, not those who kindly sourced them for me) did not lend itself to inclusion here, at least to our standards.
My quick take on the 7" edit of the title track: While I like the reverse fade at the end as preserved on the album track and full 12" version, it's a bit much for radio play and I agree with the reasoning behind editing it out for the 7". Not that it helped, I'm sure, as while a beautiful track, it's not exactly daytime Radio 1 stuff.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:05 AM 26 comments
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Sunday, November 13, 2011
ET(aatb) 13: RTT192 "Bigmouth Strikes Again"
Zip File (44 MB)
"Bigmouth Strikes Again"
Rough Trade RTT192
Produced by Morrissey and Marr
Engineered by Stephen Street May 1986
Tracks:
1 Bigmouth Strikes Again
2 Money Changes Everything
3 Unloveable
4 Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others (Australian unique edit)
Sources:
1 from The Queen Is Dead (ROUGHCD96, June 1986)
2 from The World Won't Listen (WEA 450991898-2, November 1993)
3 from The World Won't Listen (ROUGHCD101, January 1987)
4 from The Queen Is Dead (Australia - Festival D30108, 1988)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
And, they're back.
Legal issues having held the band out of the public eye for the greater part of a year, the public thirst for new Smiths product was reaching fever pitch (or so we would have it).
Rough Trade supremo Geoff Travis wanted "There Is A Light" as the lead track premiering the upcoming LP The Queen Is Dead. Johnny wanted this. Johnny won. It's all one could hope for for the first new Smiths record of the year, with Moz throwing up lyrics about Walkmen and melting hearing aids and featuring blisteringly triumphant Marr guitars. Johnny called this single his "Jumping Jack Flash" moment, and it's not hard to see why. Another absolute classic in the canon, and great for drunk singalongs with friends and whisks involved (don't ask...).
"Money Changes Everything" was the second instrumental released by the band, and while not terribly phenomenal (or terribly poor), it is perhaps of greater import that Bryan Ferry would re-christen this as "The Right Stuff" and work it up with Marr post-breakup. It is one of the few Smiths tracks not to see CD release on official Rough Trade product, hence the sourcing from the lesser WEA disc.
According to Simon Goddard, "Unloveable" was short-listed for the LP but left off to include the last-minute-composition "Vicar in a Tutu". Frankly, they shouldn't have bothered, because this wipes the floor with "Vicar". Another classic composition, perhaps featuring the most bleakly ironic Moz lyric "I wear black on the outside, because black is how I feel...on the INSIDE" married to a cloyingly pretty Marr guitar figure. That this was the extra track on the 12" is shameful, but then again, many of this band's all-time classics were the so-called "extra track" on the 12". Such is this band's sheer genius.
The Australians, forever unique they shall be, decided that the reverse fade intro on the closingThe Queen Is Dead track "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others" just wasn't their cup of tea, so they chopped the fade intro and did a weird doubling edit of one of the intro phrases at approximately 0:14 into the song. I have no earthly idea why, because I can't imagine the hordes of cries pleading to "fix" the intro of the official "Some Girls..." track. But if nothing else it gave the world a slightly rare curiosity, which is why we chose to feature it here. That all said, this is perhaps Analog Loyalist's favorite piece of Smiths music ever. There is something about the guitars, the emotions within, that really gets into me. There's also no chorus figure to speak of, or, is the entire song a chorus? More Marr genius, I guess. That Moz had to throw this lyric on top just makes the juxtaposition that much greater.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:46 PM 20 comments
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Sunday, November 13, 2011
ET(aatb) 13: RTT192 "Bigmouth Strikes Again"
Zip File (44 MB)
"Bigmouth Strikes Again"
Rough Trade RTT192
Produced by Morrissey and Marr
Engineered by Stephen Street May 1986
Tracks:
1 Bigmouth Strikes Again
2 Money Changes Everything
3 Unloveable
4 Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others (Australian unique edit)
Sources:
1 from The Queen Is Dead (ROUGHCD96, June 1986)
2 from The World Won't Listen (WEA 450991898-2, November 1993)
3 from The World Won't Listen (ROUGHCD101, January 1987)
4 from The Queen Is Dead (Australia - Festival D30108, 1988)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
And, they're back.
Legal issues having held the band out of the public eye for the greater part of a year, the public thirst for new Smiths product was reaching fever pitch (or so we would have it).
Rough Trade supremo Geoff Travis wanted "There Is A Light" as the lead track premiering the upcoming LP The Queen Is Dead. Johnny wanted this. Johnny won. It's all one could hope for for the first new Smiths record of the year, with Moz throwing up lyrics about Walkmen and melting hearing aids and featuring blisteringly triumphant Marr guitars. Johnny called this single his "Jumping Jack Flash" moment, and it's not hard to see why. Another absolute classic in the canon, and great for drunk singalongs with friends and whisks involved (don't ask...).
"Money Changes Everything" was the second instrumental released by the band, and while not terribly phenomenal (or terribly poor), it is perhaps of greater import that Bryan Ferry would re-christen this as "The Right Stuff" and work it up with Marr post-breakup. It is one of the few Smiths tracks not to see CD release on official Rough Trade product, hence the sourcing from the lesser WEA disc.
According to Simon Goddard, "Unloveable" was short-listed for the LP but left off to include the last-minute-composition "Vicar in a Tutu". Frankly, they shouldn't have bothered, because this wipes the floor with "Vicar". Another classic composition, perhaps featuring the most bleakly ironic Moz lyric "I wear black on the outside, because black is how I feel...on the INSIDE" married to a cloyingly pretty Marr guitar figure. That this was the extra track on the 12" is shameful, but then again, many of this band's all-time classics were the so-called "extra track" on the 12". Such is this band's sheer genius.
The Australians, forever unique they shall be, decided that the reverse fade intro on the closingThe Queen Is Dead track "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others" just wasn't their cup of tea, so they chopped the fade intro and did a weird doubling edit of one of the intro phrases at approximately 0:14 into the song. I have no earthly idea why, because I can't imagine the hordes of cries pleading to "fix" the intro of the official "Some Girls..." track. But if nothing else it gave the world a slightly rare curiosity, which is why we chose to feature it here. That all said, this is perhaps Analog Loyalist's favorite piece of Smiths music ever. There is something about the guitars, the emotions within, that really gets into me. There's also no chorus figure to speak of, or, is the entire song a chorus? More Marr genius, I guess. That Moz had to throw this lyric on top just makes the juxtaposition that much greater.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:46 PM 41 comments
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Thursday, February 23, 2012
ET(aatb) 14: RTT193 "Panic"
Zip File (29 MB)
"Panic"
Rough Trade RTT193
Produced by John Porter
* Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
July 1986
Tracks:
1 Panic
2 Vicar In A Tutu *
3 The Draize Train
Source:
All tracks from "Panic" (RTT 193CD, fall 1988)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Certainly anyone with a passing interest in this endeavour knows the story by now: Bassist Andy Rourke comes down with a rather nasty cold, is booted out of the band, gets arrested for buying too much cold medicine, and in a fit of empathy is subsequently re-invited to the fold. In the meantime onetime Aztec Camera Craig Gannon is brought in by Johnny Marr to replace Rourke on bass, though Gannon says this is fabrication; according to him, he was brought in specifically to beef up the guitars.
Meanwhile, this silly thing called Chernobyl happens in April 1986. Moz is listening to the Beeb one morning late in April, and the storyline that morning was a discussion of the Chernobyl tragedy immediately followed by the non-sequitur "I'm Your Man" by Wham!. Enraged, he pens a strident attack on radio. Marr marries it to a glam stomper, and "Panic" is born.
This session - featuring John Porter producing, and the band recording "Panic" and instrumental track "The Draize Train" - is Gannon's first studio outing with the band. "Panic" is a fan favorite; the refrain "Hang the DJ" is amongst the most memorable bits in the band's catalog. For a Manchester band, the virtual English travelogue in the lyric doesn't reach Cheshire or Greater Manchester, oddly.
"Vicar In A Tutu" assumes its rightly position as a B-side, even though it was just released on the LP The Queen Is Dead only a few months prior. Yes, we know this song has its cheerleaders, but to the Analog Loyalist it's not anywhere close to the band's peaks.
"The Draize Train" was the third - and last - instrumental released by the band. A highly percussive affair, this track was built up around a Linn drum and sounds it (and there's no problem with that!). It's one of Marr's best instrumental performances, in a catalog full of them; its later appearance on the live set Rank really makes the song shine. RT boss Geoff Travis so loved this song he pleaded with Moz to write a lyric, which obviously Morrissey declined. It's a shame; while I don't hear an obvious vocal melody on this track, I wouldn't have put it past Moz to find one that would be perfect.
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 8:32 AM 10 comments
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Friday, February 24, 2012
ET(aatb) 15: RTT194 "Ask"
Zip File (37 MB)
"Ask"
Rough Trade RTT194
Produced by John Porter, mixed by Steve Lillywhite
* Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
October 1986
Tracks:
1 Ask (single version)
2 Cemetry Gates *
3 Golden Lights
4 Ask ("album" version)
Source:
1-3 from "Ask" (RTT 194CD, fall 1988)
4 from The World Won't Listen (ROUGHCD101, February 1987)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
The band's second single as a 5-piece, this breezy strummer is yet another clear fan favorite. I wonder what buck-toothed Luxembourgian lasses thought, however... Great guitar interplay between Johnny Marr and Craig Gannon, you hear all sorts of wicked guitar effects including fake seagulls done on guitar. Had John Porter had his way, it would have been even more amazingly tracked, though - Morrissey had Steve Lillywhite mix it without the map detailing the hundreds of guitars on the track.
"Cemetry Gates" as legend has it was written in about 3 minutes by Marr in his kitchen, and suddenly they had the song. Not much more needs to be said; it too is a classic and deserves all the exposure it can get.
Regarding "Golden Lights"... Err, is this the Smiths? Perhaps the most wretched track in the catalogue; Moz sounds ridiculous and this insipid Twinkle cover doesn't really rate at all. Porter says its initial incarnation was much better before Lillywhite got his hands on it.
As to the "album mix" of "Ask": There is no technical "album mix" because the song was never taken from an album. The single (and original) version drops in at 3:05, whereas that released on the various compilations stretches an additional 13 or so seconds to 3:18. As detailed as I am, I've not taken the chance to lay the two versions atop each other and find those spare 13 seconds. Anyone who can find them, let me know!
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:57 AM 16 comments
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ET(aatb) 16: RTT195 "Shoplifters Of The World Unite"
Monday, March 5, 2012
Zip File (51 MB)
"Shoplifters Of The World Unite"
Rough Trade RTT195
Produced by Johnny Marr
* Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
** Produced by John Porter
January 1987
Tracks:
1 Shoplifters Of The World Unite
2 London *
3 Half A Person *
4 You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby ("UK version") **
5 You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby ("US version") **
Sources:
1-4 from The World Won't Listen (ROUGHCD101, February 1987)
5 from Louder Than Bombs (ROUGHCD255, November 1988)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Second guitarist Craig Gannon ceased to be a Smith at the completion of the band's 30 October 1986 gig at Manchester's Free Trade Hall, though he wasn't to find out for a week or so afterwards. Thankfully for him, the band had stockpiled some tracks recorded with his services in the month or two previous to his dismissal.
"Shoplifters Of The World Unite" was not one of them, though the track initially shortlisted as the A-side for RTT195 was (more on that later). "Shoplifters", recorded shortly after Johnny Marr's near-fatal car crash in November 1986, is the only Smiths track credited to Marr alone with regards to production; it's a stunning look back at (and update of) the swampy vibe that lifted "How Soon Is Now?" to greatness, and a portrait of a band that is truly locked-in on all cylinders. Morrissey's contribution led Rough Trade to promote the record with absurd "Shoplifter" carrying bags at participating record shops.
"Shoplifters" was, for various reasons, a last-minute substitute A-side for "You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby" - a wonderfully classic Smithsian Marr jangle-a-thon that easily sits in this writer's short list of "Best Smiths Songs Ever". Produced by John Porter, "You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby" was recorded in October 1986 with Gannon contributing second guitar, and got so far through the release schedule that artwork proofs are in existence with this as the lead track on RTT195, and a so-called "pressing error" actually saw this song surface in January 1987 in "Shoplifters" sleeves - ahead of its release on February's The World Won't Listen compilation as the exclusive "new track". Two mixes of this track exist, one on ROUGH101 and one on (initially US/Canada only) Louder Than Bombs, and the mixes are different enough to warrant both included here. The US/Canada mix seems a bit more refined, with audible extra effects on Morrissey's vocals and slightly different guitar lines. The EQ on the US/Canada version was really shitty, so I matched it with the ROUGH101 version and it virtually leaps off the platter now. It's truly a stunner.
"London" is perhaps - along with "What She Said" - the hardest track in the band's catalog. A Marr tour-de-force if there ever was one, the song is off from the word go on a hurtling trip from Manchester to Euston station.
"Half A Person" is a track 99.9% of other bands would trumpet as their "Best Song Ever" and re-re-release it over and over again on countless compilations, reissued singles, etc. For The Smiths, it's just another Extra Track on the 12", and a track that, according to Marr, was written in the staircase at the studio where it was recorded. I was sixteen, clumsy and shy when I first heard this song myself, and while I was not a backscrubber, or staying at YWCAs, or even in London, the song struck an immediate chord in me and was the first song that truly cemented my love of this band.
Back to "You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby": I remember reading an interview with mastering engineer Frank Arkwright and Johnny Marr at around the time the Sound Of The Smiths compilation came out, a few years back, and Arkwright had mentioned that removing the varispeed effect from the song's master gave the song an entirely new life. (What he meant was that the master was keyed to play faster/higher pitched than normal, and in fact what saw release on both the UK and US/Canada compilations of the day was this unnaturally higher pitched/faster variant.) Intrigued, I slowed the track down to concert A440 pitch, and it really does feel and groove like a new song. 25 years of exposure to the wrong-speed version still means the "correct" version sounds "wrong", but "wrong" doesn't mean "worse". I can't listen to the original versions these days as Morrissey now sounds like a chipmunk in comparison (the re-pitched, slowed-down version is much more in Morrissey's natural baritone, and the drums sound appropriately "oomphy" for lack of a better term).
- Analog Loyalist
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 10:06 AM 11 comments
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Tuesday, March 6, 2012
ET(aatb) 17: Virgin 90229 "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out"
Zip File (38 MB)
"There Is A Light That Never Goes Out"
Virgin (France) 90229
Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
* Produced by John Porter
January 1987
Tracks:
1 There Is A Light That Never Goes Out
2 London (Peel Session, recorded 2 December 1986, BBC Maida Vale 4) *
3 Half A Person (Peel Session, recorded 2 December 1986, BBC Maida Vale 4) *
Sources:
1 from The Queen Is Dead (ROUGHCD96, August 1986)
2-3 from some forgotten lossless bootleg (ha!)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
OK, so this wasn't really a Rough Trade release. However, its sleeve is truly one of the iconic ones in the catalog, and shamefully wasn't used much beyond promo material in the homelands. So, it's really here just to feature the sleeve.
The French chose to issue a 7" of "There Is A Light That Never Goes Out" in place of "Shoplifters", and backed it with the common "Half A Person" as released on "Shoplifters".
I have nothing to say about "There Is A Light" - if you don't know this song, you're reading the wrong blog. A giant among giants.
To avoid excessive reduplication, I decided to back this with the best versions I could find of two of the (few) unreleased and truly unique tracks in the catalog, the December '86 Peel takes on "London" and "Half A Person". "London" absolutely crushes the Street studio version; Marr's guitars are, simply, awesome. "Half A Person" doesn't differ nearly as much as the Street studio version, but it's still a nice piece of music that deserves release.
Our "London" is easily the best version I've ever heard of this track, on the various bootlegs that feature it. As featured here, it's near impossible to tell it's not from official BBC-released sources. The same can't be said for "Half A Person" though I did yeoman's work in tarting it up for this project; while I have heard "better" captures of it, they're all lossy BBC digital streaming versions and aren't up to lossless sourcing muster. The giveaway too on the digital stream captures is the swirlyness/smearing of the highs, especially cymbals. The source here was an actual off-air recording, tape hiss and all. It goes without saying that anybody who can help with pre-broadcast, or high-quality analog recording of the BBC broadcasts (without Peel's speaking over intros/outtros, or any other broadcaster for that matter), please do so.
- Analog Loyalist
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:40 AM 6 comments
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Thursday, March 8, 2012
ET(aatb) 18: RTT196 "Sheila Take A Bow"
Zip File (39 MB)
"Sheila Take A Bow"
Rough Trade RTT196
Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
* Produced by John Porter for the BBC
** Produced by John Porter
April 1987
Tracks:
1 Sheila Take A Bow
2 Is It Really So Strange? *
3 Sweet And Tender Hooligan *
4 Sheila Take A Bow (John Porter reject) **
Sources:
1-3 from "Sheila Take A Bow" (Line [Germany] LICD9.00308L, Spring 1987)
4 from Unreleased Demos & Instrumentals (unofficial LP December 2010)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
December 1986 and January 1987 saw the band repair to the studio to gin up tracks for future singles and demo ideas for the then-forthcoming LP sessions later that spring.
"Sheila Take A Bow" was first recorded zingily (new word!) with John Porter, with guitar lines zinging and eeping and twanging all across the stereo field. Less stompily glam than the released Stephen Street version, this variant was rejected for unknown reasons and presumably binned. It was to be Porter's last recording session with the band.
They regrouped with Street to attempt "Sheila" again. Lifting the odd Porter-played guitar line from the Porter recording - to his chagrin, not because he wouldn't have allowed it but because they never asked - Street and the boys returned to the T.Rex "Panic"-style glam attack, with great success. Porter's zing is replaced by Street's stomp, for lack of a better term. I guess you could say they threw their homework into the fire, binning the Porter recording.
Oddly, despite having completed versions of the two selected B-sides in the can from studio sessions dating back to spring 1986 with Craig Gannon on second guitar, the band chose to feature recordings made for John Peel in December 1986, at BBC Maida Vale 4, as the B-sides. Not having heard the studio version of "Sweet and Tender Hooligan" (recorded during the May 1986 "Panic" sessions), I can't say if they made the right decision by using the Peel "SaTH", but the Beeb take is a pretty nice rocker. The studio take of "Is It Really So Strange?" - recorded during the June 1986 "Ask" sessions - did finally see unofficial release on the double LP bootleg Unreleased Demos & Instrumentals in December 2010. I think using the Peel take was the right call here; while the structure, melody and lyric is in place on the abandoned studio recording, the drums sound like guide drums (almost Linn-like) and the overall recording lacks the sonic impact and shine the Peel recording gave it. The cynic in me also wonders if they kept the with-Gannon studio versions in-house so as to not give Gannon the pleasure (and royalties?) of credits on further Smiths releases.
While we've given the world a listen to the Porter "Sheila" via the petition started by yours truly, the thought was it was only fair to bring it into this single too. So, our special bonus is the Porter version, superbly tarted up from bootleg vinyl to the point that the vinyl lineage is undetectable. Please note that this version presented here supersedes all previous releases of this track; I obtained a high-definition transfer from a new source and that transfer - in all ways - bettered that which was used to prepare the other blog's (re)mastering of the bootleg LP. (Watch the other blog for an updated, re-remastered posting of the set in its entirety, from this new high-definition transfer.)
- Analog Loyalist
Posted by Analog Loyalist at 12:30 AM 11 comments
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fak3r

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[Quote]

The last post got cut off, must have hit the limit, regardless, here's the rest!
Thursday, March 8, 2012
ET(aatb) 19: RTT197 "Girlfriend In A Coma"
Zip File (34 MB)
"Girlfriend In A Coma"
Rough Trade RTT197
Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
* Produced by Grant Showbiz, remixed by Stephen Street
August 1987
Tracks:
1 Girlfriend In A Coma
2 Work Is A Four-Letter Word *
3 I Keep Mine Hidden *
4 Work Is A Four-Letter Word (7" edit) *
5 Girlfriend In A Coma (demo)
Sources:
1-3 from "Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before" (Line [Germany] LICD9.00440J, Fall 1987)
4 edited from 2 by Analog Loyalist
5 from Unreleased Demos & Instrumentals (unofficial LP December 2010)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
Spring 1987 saw the band, with Stephen Street, retreat to the idyllic Bath countryside to record what was to be their swan-song LP "Strangeways, Here We Come". Apparently the album sessions were pictures of camraderie; all accounts say that the sessions themselves would never be portents of the fractures that the band would sustain just months later.
So it was that "Girlfriend In A Coma" was chosen to be the lead single for the LP. A beautiful, jaunty, acoustic-tinged number, it wasn't quite the "Smiths are back!" moment that "Bigmouth" was a year earlier, but it did foreshadow to a degree the direction Johnny Marr wanted the band to take going forward.
Then, Marr had a rethink and eventually wanted to take a break from the pressures of no management (or management stifled by Morrissey, depending on who you believe). By his account, he didn't want to break up the band, just take some time away from it all and regroup later on with a more concrete plan for the future. Morrissey, however, sensing discontent, ordered the band back to the studio to record B-sides for the upcoming singles. So, with the band at soundman Grant Showbiz's studio in London, they set to tape the tracks that really told Marr that the end was near. Morrissey wanted the band to cover Cilia Black, so they did "Work Is A Four-Letter Word" which Marr hated (though the recording is professional, as you would expect). The session also produced the final Morrissey/Marr original composition, "I Keep Mine Hidden" - a jaunty music hall ditty that Morrissey claimed was his favorite Smiths track of all time (why...?). It sounds nothing like previous Smiths tracks, and I doubt this direction is what Marr intended had the band not split shortly thereafter.
The 12" of "Girlfriend" had the full-length "Work Is...", while the 7" featured an early fade version. We have both here.
As with "Sheila Take A Bow", we decided to bonus this post with the first version of "Girlfriend" recorded in January 1987, during the Street "Sheila" sessions. Much more reggae-influenced than the final version, about the only thing that survived from this session was the majority of Morrissey's lyric/melody, and Andy Rourke's bass (surprisingly, close inspection of the final version's bass track reveals the reggae pattern prominent in the demo recording, which I never noticed before hearing the demo). Just like with the Porter "Sheila", the demo "Girlfriend" we have here is from a newly-sourced high-resolution transfer from bootleg vinyl, with all evidence of vinyl in the lineage gone. It's another track that could be lifted from this blog and released by Rhino.
- Analog Loyalist
Posted by Analog Loyalist at 10:49 AM 14 comments
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Sunday, March 11, 2012
ET(aatb) 20: RTT198 "I Started Something I Couldn't Finish"
Zip File (57 MB)
"I Started Something I Couldn't Finish"
Rough Trade RTT198
Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
* Produced by Troy Tate
** Recorded by Grant Showbiz
November 1987
Tracks:
1 I Started Something I Couldn't Finish
2 Pretty Girls Make Graves *
3 Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others (live) **
4 What's The World (live) **
5 Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before
Sources:
1, 5 from "Strangeways, Here We Come" (ROUGH CD106, September 1987)
2-3 from Stop Me (Victor [Japan] VDP-28025, Fall 1987)
4 from "Sweet And Tender Hooligan" (Reprise (USA) 9 43525-2, May 1995)
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
The band was no more. Johnny Marr had left for Los Angeles, the remaining Smiths tried carrying on with replacement guitarists for a couple seconds, and then the band was put to rest. Morrissey was amidst recording sessions for his debut solo LP, yet there was still a Smiths record to promote. With no new tracks in the can (ha! Just see the various demos that saw release in 2010...) to use as B-sides, the single was filled out with selected live recordings and alternate session takes.
The A-side itself was a last-minute substitute for the obvious single candidate "Stop Me If You Think You've Heard This One Before", which was pulled from the schedule in the UK at the last minute due to concerns about bombings/murder references in the lyric. Other territories kept "Stop Me..." as the single, as planned - hence our inclusion of "Stop Me..." on this set too.
"I Started Something I Couldn't Finish" is one of the least interesting Smiths single A-sides; it's not a bad track, it's just not great. It's almost Smiths-by-numbers, though interestingly enough the well-paced drum stomp is rooted to an audible Linn drum. I guess the most interesting bit is the fade-out where you hear Morrissey calling out to Stephen Street about the vocal take...
The live "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others" was performed only once, at the band's final UK gig ever, in December 1987. It was challenging to master as it's quite noisy; I think people will be pleased with the results. Oddly, Morrissey sings a third verse here not present on the studio version. Johnny plays like he has three hands.
"What's the World" is a James cover, performed during the band's brief Scottish tour in fall 1985. An odd choice for a B-side, it was featured only on the cassette single release in the UK. In the USA, Sire/Reprise felt the need to promote the 1995 Singles compilation LP with a subset of rarities, so the label released "Sweet and Tender Hooligan" as a CD and 12" single in the US backed with the two "Girlfriend" B-sides, and "What's the World" taken from an actual UK cassette single as the label couldn't locate a master.
Most interesting is the Troy Tate abandoned debut LP session version of "Pretty Girls Make Graves". It's got a unique clip-clop pseudofolk canter to the rhythm, and according to Simon Goddard in the wonderful book The Smiths: The Songs That Saved Your Life was released as an overdue fulfillment of a promise by Geoff Travis to the cellist who played on the track.
"Stop Me..." is one of the classics in the catalog: urgent guitars, strident lyrics, just a stunner. Marr returns to his old trick - first done on "This Charming Man" - of bashing his guitar strings with a knife. It was the obvious choice for the single and a shame it didn't get to serve that role in the UK.
- Analog Loyalist
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 11:16 AM 15 comments
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Tuesday, March 13, 2012
ET(aatb) 21: RTT200 "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me"
Zip File (66 MB)
"Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me"
Rough Trade RTT200
Produced by Morrissey and Marr, engineered by Stephen Street
* Produced by John Porter for the BBC
December 1987
Tracks:
1 Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me
2 Rusholme Ruffians *
3 Nowhere Fast *
4 William, It Was Really Nothing *
5 How Soon Is Now? *
6 Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me (single edit)
Sources:
1 from "Strangeways, Here We Come" (ROUGH CD106, September 1987)
2-4 from "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me" (RTT 200CD, December 1987)
5 from some unknown lossless bootleg (ha!)
6 edited from 1 by Analog Loyalist
Restoration:
Gentle EQ as needed, a smidgen of tasteful noise reduction if required, and very cautious, gentle peak limiting.
Artwork for this, and every other release we'll be featuring, was sourced from the amazing Vulgar Picture treasure trove of sleeve artwork scans (with permission).
Notes:
And the book was finally written on the Smiths, as far as contemporary releases went. The last official, planned single from the band was one of the most desolate tracks in their catalog, the beautiful "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me". Except in this case it wasn't just another false alarm, the band truly was over. The single release stripped out the extended intro segment to go bang into the body of the song, which we also present here.
The B-sides were selected from the band's June 1984 Peel session, one that wasn't as exciting as their other sessions but a good one nonetheless. Oddly, "Nowhere Fast" as released by Rough Trade here is mono, while the actual broadcast version is full stereo. I've not been able to source a quality lossless stereo version of this track, so we unfortunately don't get the whole stereo effect here.
"How Soon Is Now?" was also done for this session, but per Johnny Marr the session version simply consisted of the band bringing in the multitracks from the original recording and re-jiggering them for the session. I think maybe Morrissey re-sung the lyric, and not all the guitars are present here, but besides that it's not super different from the "studio" version. I used the best lossless version I could locate, as it was not released with the other tracks on the 12"; if anyone can locate a better version that's not from a BBC digital stream capture and is without DJ talking over the intro/outtro please let us know.
- Analog Loyalist
+++++
Tuesday, March 13, 2012
ET(aatb): That's a wrap.
That's it, folks. At times challenging but mostly a joy while trawling through the songs (and the mastering), this project is complete. Every Smiths Rough Trade single, with a few curveballs thrown in. One of the joys of doing this has been in the excruciating detail I went through while mastering the audio; I learned a lot over the course of the endeavour and if anything, my appreciation of the music has increased which I'd not believed possible.
I want to thank our readers, those who provided needed behind-the-scenes support and encouragement, and those who helped source material for this project. Thanks to Flavio over at vulgarpicture.com for the artwork.
This blog will remain active/available for as long as Google and Mediafire allow it; I will also promise to update previous postings if new sources for "questionable" material present themselves (such as the Peel tracks taken from bootlegs). So keep scanning those tapes!
In the meantime I will continue to blog over at The Power of Independent Trucking, and will look to continue my involvement in this exciting and surprisingly popular Recycle project with our next gig, REMcycle :)
-Analog Loyalist
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:30 AM 11 comments
+++++
Many thanks to Mr. AL for remaining patient with me through long periods of down-time because I couldn't get motivated to finish artwork.
There will be long-promised updates over at New Order/Joy Division Recycle, and you can keep up with me through my own website or through Facebook.
The next Recycle project from myself and Bruce Bartlett will be Force Is Machine: Nitzer Ebb 1984-1995.
- Jeb
Posted by 50 Pound Note at 9:34 AM 45 comments
Good night... and thank you!
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Arco

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Post 02-Jan-2019 22:51 (after 5 days)

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thank you
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